Area Profile: Hyde Park

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Did you know that Hyde Park is Australia’s oldest park? There is no lie in saying that Sydney’s Hyde Park is also one of the most well known. With just over 16 hectares of wide-open space in the heart of central Sydney, there is definitely no shortage of lush grass if you want to claim a small piece of land for a spontaneous picnic, or simply take a seat and relax. As well as some serious grass acreage, Hyde Park is home to hundreds of big, leafy trees that offer cool shade for a break from the sun.

If you visit Hyde Park South you will find the Anzac Memorial and the Pool of Reflection. History fans, veterans and their families will appreciate its beauty, but it’s something everyone should visit and experience. As Australia marks the 100th anniversary of the First World War, the NSW Government is enhancing the Anzac Memorial.

The ‘Centenary Project’ will be the enduring legacy of NSW commemorations. It will realise the vision of the original architect, Bruce Dellit, and introduce new spaces. We’re very excited to see the final product, watch our Facebook page for regular photo updates.

The Centenary Project will allow the Memorial to tell the stories of NSW’s involvement in all wars and peace-keeping missions and honour those who have served. You can read more about the Anzac Memorial and the ‘Centenary Project’ here.

The most notable feature in Hyde Park North is the Archibald Fountain, located at the centre of ‘Birubi Circle’ and at the intersection of the main avenues crossing Hyde Park. Look for the big water feature dripping in ancient mythology. A bronze Apollo is surrounded by horses’ heads, dolphins and tortoises.

The fountain, by French sculptor Francois Sicard, commemorates the association between Australia and France in World War 1. It draws its themes from Greek antiquity and is an important example in Sydney of the classical revivalist sculpture of the 1920’s and 1930’s, known as Art Deco.

If you need a caffeine boost or wish to satisfy your sweet tooth in Hyde Park, there is the great place named Metro St James Cafe in Hyde Park North, a short walk from the Archibald Fountain.

Parties and special events also find a spot in the park throughout the year. Hyde Park has hosted the Sydney Food and Wine Fair, the annual Night Noodle Markets, the launch of NAIDOC’s weeklong Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander celebration and quite a few pop-up events for the renowned Sydney Festival.

Fun Fact: Hyde Park is split in two halves known north and south thanks to Park Street. Sydney is very creative with street names, dividing a park with such an original street name, Park Street. Formerly, an electric tramway ran down Park Street between Elizabeth and College Streets. It was removed in 1960.

We love Hyde Park, there is so much more to learn but this is a great snapshot for you. Feel free to contact us anytime if you would like to know more about Hyde Park.